Our approach

Collaborative management for multiple benefits

Landscape management by landscape members

The Greater Mudumu Landscape is managed under a co-management approach whereby there is high-level consensus amongst all stakeholders on developing an overall vision, objectives and targets that will be to the greater good of all stakeholders, achieved through the implementation of an agreed Co-management and Development Plan.

Vision

The Vision of the Mudumu Landscape Association is to promote, support and facilitate the collaborative management and development of the Mudumu Landscape for enhanced landscape and biodiversity conservation and socio-economic development.

Purpose

The Purpose of the Mudumu Landscape Association is to foster and enhance collaboration by the members, synergistic planning and implementation of the Vision, Objectives and Principles contained in the Constitution and the Collaborative management and Development Plan as may be developed and revised and updated from time to time, within the area comprising the Mudumu Landscape.

Management framework

Our approach is outlined in the Constitution of the Mudumu Landscape Association.

NamParks Project

This project has a clear goal and objective to see the North Eastern Parks contribute not only to local and trans-boundary conservation, but also to local economic development and the improvement of rural livelihoods. The North Eastern Parks are critical for the sustainability of conservancies in the north-east of Namibia, which are generally too small to be viable as core areas for wildlife breeding and utilisation purposes. Also the North Eastern parks are unsustainable without good relationships with their neighbours and residents (in the case of Bwabwata National Park), or if areas outside of parks are left undeveloped with high levels of poverty and heavily depleted natural resources. For this reason an integrated approach to park management and regional development is required.

The logframe in the Phase-3 Separate Agreement proposes the following broad results:

  1. Infrastructure and park management of the North Eastern Parks is improved.
  2. Provisions are made for resident and neighbour friendly park management by MET
  3. Structures are established to increase the income from park-related activities of communities neighbouring the North Eastern parks
  4. The MET is strengthened in their role in the establishment of KAZA TFCA.
  5. The MET Project Management Team is supported.

How does Mudumu Landscape fit into the national context?

State owned protected areas

Namibia has over the years become a world leader in pursuing conservation initiatives. Remarkable achievements have taken place in the conservation of Namibia’s biodiversity and safeguarding ecological integrity of our ecosystems. To date, our country boasts 20 state-run protected areas that represent nearly 17% of the total land area. Most of these parks are world renowned for their uniqueness as tourism destinations and for their species richness.

  • 20 state-run protected areas
  • nearly 17% of the total land area

Communal Conservancies

Complementing the network of protected areas are communal conservancies and private land used for conservation. To date, Namibia has 82 registered conservancies covering over 17% of the country while the private land used for conservation represents slightly over 6% of the country land surface. A growing demand to create more conservancies across the country is an indication of the Ministry of Environment and Tourism's Community-Based Natural Resource Management programme’s successes.

  • 82 registered communal conservancies
  • over 17% of the total land area

Therefore Government, communities and private sector, in total have close to half of the country, an astonishing 42% earmarked for conservation. This is a remarkable achievement. However,  setting land aside for conservation without putting appropriate measures to manage effectively will not safeguard our biodiversity. It is against this background that the Ministry is consciously and continuously exploring new ways to improve management effectiveness through new initiatives especially those that provide positive incentives to conserve biodiversity.

Landscapes

Under the Nam-Place Project five landscape initiatives are underway to ensure that: protected landscape conservation areas are established, land uses in areas adjacent to existing Protected Areas is compatible with biodiversity conservation objectives; corridors are established to sustain the viability of wildlife populations. The landscapes are:

  1. Mudumu Landscape
  2. Greater Waterberg Landscape
  3. Windhoek Green Belt Landscape
  4. Greater Sossusvlei-Namib Landscape
  5. Greater Fish River Canyon Landscape

This brings an additional 15,550 km² of land under protected landscapes management arrangements.


Relevant literature

  • A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions

    A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions. Final Report. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry, National Remote Sensing Center. Report for Lux-Development SA

    A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions.
  • A strategic management plan for Mudumu Landscape 2012 - 2015

    A strategic management plan for Mudumu Landscape 2012 - 2015

    This document sets out a Strategic Management Plan for the Mudumu Landscape, Caprivi Region, Namibia. The plan builds on a number of existing management plans that have been developed for different management units within the landscape. These include the management plans of conservancies, community forests, the Mudumu North Complex (MNC), the Mudumu South Complex (MSC), the Five-year Strategic Plan for the Mudumu Landscape Association, and the Kwando-Linyanti Integrated Tourism Development Plan. The Landscape Strategic Management Plan addresses key threats to biodiversity and addresses the human and social dimensions of conservation in an area where people are mostly poor and dependent upon the land and its natural resources for their livelihoods.
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  • Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA

    Suich, H., Busch, J. and Barbancho, N. 2005. Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA. Conservation International South Africa, Paper No. 4

    The Kavango–Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade. Recently, the idea has been revitalised by the ministers of those five countries, who seek to establish a world-class transfrontier conservation area and tourism destination in the Okavango and Zambezi river basin regions of those countries, within the context of sustainable development.
  • Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) - Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin

     Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry. Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) - Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin

    The Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin is located in the north-eastern part of Namibia stretching across the entire Caprivi region. The basin rivers form borders with Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana in the north and east respectively.
  • Lake Liambezi, Namibia: fishing community assumes management responsibility, July 2011

     Tweddle, D., Weyl, O.L.F., Hay, C.J., Peel, R.A. and Shapumba, N. 2011. Lake Liambezi, Namibia: fishing community assumes management responsibility, July 2011. Integrated co-management of the Zambezi/Chobe River Fisheries Resources Project. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase II/4

    The Caprivi Region in Namibia is a narrow strip of land extending eastwards from the northeastern corner of the country, and is bordered by Angola and Zambia to the north, Botswana to the south and Zimbabwe to the east. The region is flat and characterised by numerous swamps and slow-flowing rivers. A major swamp system is centred on Lake Liambezi. This lake receives water from several sources. To the west, the Kwando River originates in the Angolan Highlands and forms the boundary between Angola and Zambia. Passing through the Caprivi Strip, the Kwando then percolates through the Linyanti swamps on the Namibia-Botswana border before feeding into Lake Liambezi. Rainfall and run-off from the area to the north of the lake also feed the lake. Floodwaters from the Zambezi enter the lake from the east during high flood years from two directions. The Chobe River reverses flow direction annually when the Zambezi floods and enters the lake from the southeast, while the Bukalo channel enters the northeast of the lake from the Caprivi floodplain. Outflow from the lake via the Chobe River when floodwaters recede is intermittent and dependent on lake level.
  • Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    Jones, B.T.B. 2008. Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area. Final Report

    This report has been commissioned in order to provide a foundation for the Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area (TFCA) countries to consider policy and legal harmonisation regarding the management of natural resources. The KAZA participating countries are Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
  • Mudumu Landscape semi-controlled landfill site simplified waste disposal site design

    Mudumu Landscape semi-controlled landfill site simplified waste disposal site design

    This report outlines the design objectives and considerations that need to be taken into account in the design of a landfill. Management systems for the control of leachate and groundwater as well as the operations and maintenance are discussed
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  • Mudumu North Complex: Wildlife Co-Management in the Kwando Area of the Caprivi

    Martin, R.B. 2006. The Mudumu North Complex: Wildlife Co-Management in the Kwando Area of the Caprivi. A Study for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism and the Management Committee of the Mudumu North Complex

  • People, plants and landscapes: A review and recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia

    Cunningham, A.B. 2007. People, plants and landscapes: A review and recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia.

    This report, written for the Integrated Community Ecosystem Management (ICEMA)/French Fund for Global Environment (FFEM) project, reviews and makes recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia. As the driest country in sub-equatorial Africa, with an economy based largely on its natural resource assets (farming, mining, fishing and tourism focused on wildlife), Namibia faces major challenges. With policy support, it can also grasp good opportunities related to high value plant species. A focus on high value plant species is timely.
  • Plant resources & monitoring. Follow up report and recommendations on further integration of high value plant species into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia

    Cunningham, AB. 2008. Plant resources & monitoring. Follow up report and recommendations on further integration of high value plant species into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia. A report for the Integrated Community Ecosystem Management (ICEMA)/French Fund for Global Environment (FFEM) Project

  • Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan

     Brown, C.J. and Jones, B.T.B. (ed.)1994. Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan. Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Wildlife, Conservation and Tourism, Namibia

    Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan.
  • Species management plan - Southern Reedbuck (Redunca arundinum arundinum), Common Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus), Red Lechwe (Kobus leche leche), Puku (Kobus vardoni)

     MET 2003. Species management plan - Southern Reedbuck (Redunca arundinum arundinum), Common Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus), Red Lechwe (Kobus leche leche), Puku (Kobus vardoni)

    The wetland grazer populations in the Caprivi have fluctuated over the past century from being relatively abundant to being near extinction. The fluctuations appear to be linked to long term rainfall cycles. Being on the fringe of larger populations in Botswana, they have usually been able to recover from low levels when the rainfall regime is favourable. Today, the population levels of all four species are a matter for concern: puku are almost extinct; waterbuck have been seen sporadically on surveys but, since 1994, there are no records exceeding 20 animals; lechwe have slumped from nearly 13,000 in 1980 to fewer than 200 now; and reedbuck numbers are about 200 at best.
  • Species management plan - Southern Savanna Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)

     MET 2002. Species management plan - Southern Savanna Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)

    Although not threatened at present, the Namibian buffalo population is well below the level at which it should exist. There is a potential range of some 10,000km2 available for buffalo in the Caprivi and this should carry at least 15,000 buffalo. Because of the high value of buffalo in the international safari hunting industry, the potential net income from wildlife in the Caprivi could be raised from its present level of US$2.5 million to US$7.5 million if the buffalo population was at carrying capacity.
  • Spotted hyaena ecology and human-wildlife conflict in the Caprivi Region of Namibia

     Hanssen, L. 2011. Spotted hyaena ecology and human-wildlife conflict in the Caprivi Region of Namibia. 2011 Research Report

  • The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi

    Mulonga, S., Suich, H. and Murphy, C. 2003. The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 59, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The Caprivi Region is one region in Namibia where the community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) programme has achieved considerable success, in terms of capacity building and natural resource management. However, the conflict between people and wildlife is perceived by local residents to have worsened since the advent of the CBNRM programme. This paper forms part of the WILD Project research, which is a Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) participatory research project investigating the change that the Namibian CBNRM programme has brought to people\'s livelihoods.
  • Waste management implementation plan for Mudumu Landscape

    Waste management implementation plan for Mudumu Landscape

    Waste management has been identified as one of the problems in the landscape that need urgent attention. Uncontrolled dumping of waste is common in the landscape. This is mainly due to the fact that there is no designated central waste disposal site. The NAM-PLACE Project has therefore appointed SED Consultancy to assist the ML with the design of a new waste disposal site and the development of a Waste Management Implementation Plan. This plan provides a synopsis of the current waste management practices in the ML and presents recommended initiatives to promote sustainable and integrated waste management in the landscape. The plan also promotes the effective use of the proposed waste disposal site and allocates responsibilities to all stakeholders in the action plan.
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