Literature and other resources

You can find more literature and resources by searching Namibia's Environmental Information Service and the resources section of the NACSO website.


Relevant literature

  • Namibia Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment

    Ministry of Environment and Tourism. 2008. Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Namibia. Final Report

    Vulnerability and Adaptation assessment to climate change carried out in preparation of the Second National Communication in meeting Government’s obligations to the UNFCCC. The report addresses the vulnerability of the water and agricultural sectors to climate change, and suggest adaptation measures to cope with the expected impacts. Vulnerability is placed in the socio-economic contexts of rural areas, in particular the Karas and Caprivi regions.
    » Download

Relevant literature

  • Bwabwata National Park - People and wildlife - a shared history

    Bwabwata National Park - People and wildlife - a shared history

    Bwabwata has been inhabited for millennia, but it is the more recent history that has shaped the Bwabwata National Park of today. Proclaimed in the 1960s as the Caprivi Nature Reserve, then as the Caprivi Game Park, no initial wildlife management took place because the area was a restricted security zone, occupied first by the South African police and subsequently by the South African Defence Force (SADF).
  • Bwabwata National Park - Profile

    Ministry of Environment and Tourism.  Bwabwata National Park - Profile

    The Park was first proclaimed as the Caprivi Game Reserve in 1966 and upgraded to the Caprivi Game Park in 1968. It was gazetted as the Bwabwata National Park in 2007 and incorporated the former Mahango Game Reserve. The Park has had a chequered history as it was declared a military area by the South African Defence Force during Namibia's war of liberation. It was not until after Independence in 1990 that the Park could be properly run as a conservation area.
  • Bwabwata National Park: Kwando Core Area

    Bwabwata National Park: Kwando Core Area

    4 page leaflet describing the Kwando Core Area of Bwabwata National Park, including maps
  • Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA

    Suich, H., Busch, J. and Barbancho, N. 2005. Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA. Conservation International South Africa, Paper No. 4

    The Kavango–Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade. Recently, the idea has been revitalised by the ministers of those five countries, who seek to establish a world-class transfrontier conservation area and tourism destination in the Okavango and Zambezi river basin regions of those countries, within the context of sustainable development.
  • Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Kwandu Community Forest

    Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Kwandu Community Forest

  • Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Lubuta Community Forest

    Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Lubuta Community Forest

  • Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Masida Community Forest

    Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Masida Community Forest

  • Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Sachona

    Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Cuma, Gcwatjinga, George Mukoya, Kahenge, Katope, Likwaterera, Marienfluss, Muduva Nyangana, Nyae Nyae, Okondjombo, Ohepi, Omufituwekuta, Orupembe, Oshaampula, Otjiu-West, Puros, Sachona, Sanitatas, Zilitene

  • Information on Balyerwa Conservancy

    Information on Balyerwa Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Balyerwa Conservancy
  • Information on Dzoti Conservancy

    Information on Dzoti Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Dzoti Conservancy
  • Information on Kwandu Conservancy

    Information on Kwandu Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Kwandu Conservancy
  • Information on Mashi Conservancy

    Information on Mashi Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Mashi Conservancy
  • Information on Mayuni Conservancy

    Information on Mayuni Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Mayuni Conservancy
  • Information on Sobbe Conservancy

    Information on Sobbe Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Sobbe Conservancy
  • Information on Wuparo Conservancy

    Information on Wuparo Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Wuparo Conservancy
  • Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    Jones, B.T.B. 2008. Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area. Final Report

    This report has been commissioned in order to provide a foundation for the Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area (TFCA) countries to consider policy and legal harmonisation regarding the management of natural resources. The KAZA participating countries are Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
  • Mamili National Park - Profile

    Ministry of Environment and Tourism.  Mamili National Park - Profile

    Mamili was officially proclaimed on 1 March 1990, just days before Namibia gained Independence. The name of the park refers to the seven chiefs of that name who, since 1864, have ruled over the Mafwe people living in this eastern section of the Zambezi Region. Some refer to the area as Nkasa Rupara Park, in reference to the two dominant islands in the park. This is the largest wetland area with conservation status in Namibia, and is a haven for wetland species. When the flood waters from the Kwando River are high, Mamili becomes like a mini Okavango Delta.
  • Mashi Conservancy map

    Map of Mashi Conservancy showing community enterprises, lodges, management zones, community forests and more. By Sylvia Thomson and Roxanne Godenschweig

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  • Mayuni Conservancy map

    Map of Mayuni Conservancy showing community enterprises, lodges, infrastructure, and more. By Sylvia Thomson and Roxanne Godenschweig

    » Download
  • Mudumu National Park

    Mudumu National Park - Zambezi Region. Namibia Parks and Wildlife

    4 page leaflet describing Mudumu National Park, including maps
  • Mudumu North Complex

    Mudumu North Complex. NACSO. 1 pp.

    Poster providing information on Mudumu North Complex
  • Mudumu North Complex: Wildlife Co-Management in the Kwando Area of the Caprivi

    Martin, R.B. 2006. The Mudumu North Complex: Wildlife Co-Management in the Kwando Area of the Caprivi. A Study for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism and the Management Committee of the Mudumu North Complex

  • The ecological, social & economic implications of private game parks & private nature reserves in Namibia

    The ecological, social & economic implications of private game parks & private nature reserves in Namibia

    The Ministry of Environment & Tourism commissioned this study into the ecological, social, and economic implications of private game parks and nature reserves in Namibia. The Ministry engaged the services of an independent team of researchers consisting of an ecologist, an economist and a lawyer.
    » Download
  • Tourism in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    Suich, H. 2005. Tourism in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    The Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of a major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade
  • Woody Resources Report of Kwando Community Forest

    Kamwi, J.M. 2003. Woody Resources Report of Kwando Community Forest. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry. Namibia-Finland Forestry Programme


Relevant literature

  • Aerial Wildlife Census of the Caprivi River Systems - a survey of water bodies and floodplains 11 - 20 August 2004

     Stander, P. 2004. Aerial Wildlife Census of the Caprivi River Systems - a survey of water bodies and floodplains 11 - 20 August 2004

    An aerial wildlife census of the Caprivi River Systems in Namibia was conducted between 11 and 20 August 2004. A total count of water bodies and floodplains of the Kavango, Kwandu, Linyanti, Chobe and Zambezi was done to asses the numbers of hippopotamuses, floodplain ungulates, crocodiles, and some large birds. Counting areas were divided into 15km2 blocks and, with the use of GPS and mobile GIS technology, each block was covered intensively.
  • Analysis of Historic Fisheries Research Data for the Caprivi Region, April 2009

     Hay, C.J. and van der Waal, B.C.W. 2009. Analysis of Historic Fisheries Research Data for the Caprivi Region, April 2009. Integrated Management of Zambezi/Chobe River System - Tansboundary Fishery Resource, Namibia/Zambi/Botswana. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase I/2

    This is a summary report taken from the reference document that was prepared for the Namibia Nature Foundation. The study was commissioned to analyze all available data collected since 1997. The objectives of the report are spelled out in this document. This summary document highlights the important findings.
  • Bwabwata National Park - People and wildlife - a shared history

    Bwabwata National Park - People and wildlife - a shared history

    Bwabwata has been inhabited for millennia, but it is the more recent history that has shaped the Bwabwata National Park of today. Proclaimed in the 1960s as the Caprivi Nature Reserve, then as the Caprivi Game Park, no initial wildlife management took place because the area was a restricted security zone, occupied first by the South African police and subsequently by the South African Defence Force (SADF).
  • Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2011

    Caprivi Game Count poster 2011

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi; dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2010, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2012

    Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2012

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi; dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2011, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2013

    Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2013

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi; dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2012, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi crocodile research project

    Aust, P. 2007. Caprivi crocodile research project

    This report contains information on aspects of the ecology, conservation and management of crocodiles in North Eastern Namibia. It is intended to give an overview of the research work carried out by the Caprivi Crocodile Research Project over the last two years (2006/2007).
  • Caprivi Elephant Monitoring Project. Final Report

     Rodwell, T.C. 1995. Caprivi Elephant Monitoring Project. Final Report (October 1992 to October 1995)

  • Caprivi Game Count poster 2011: conservancies only

    Caprivi Game Count poster 2011: conservancies only

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi (conservancies only); dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2010, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi Game Count poster 2011: protected areas only

    Caprivi Game Count poster 2011: protected areas only

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi (protected areas only); dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2010, population estimates and trends
  • Economic Analysis of Land Use Policies for Livestock, Wildlife and Disease Management in Caprivi, Namibia, with Potential Wider Implications for Regional Transfrontier Conservation Areas

    Barnes, J.I. 2013. Economic Analysis of Land Use Policies for Livestock, Wildlife and Disease Management in Caprivi, Namibia, with Potential Wider Implications for Regional Transfrontier Conservation Areas. Technical Report to the Wildlife Conservation Society’s AHEAD Program and the World Wildlife Fund

    Standard cost-benefit analysis was applied to several future policy options for land use and animal disease management in Caprivi, Namibia. Emphasis was placed on the livestock-wildlife interface and Caprivi's role as central to the Kavango Zambezi (KAZA) transfrontier conservation area (TFCA). Empirically-based enterprise models measuring private and economic values for livestock and wildlife sectors in Caprivi were used to measure returns to investment for policy options regarding animal disease management and land use allocation. Options included commodity-based trade (CBT) and veterinary control fencing approaches to animal disease management. CBT is a production and marketing approach, which assures product safety regardless of the disease status of the area of origin and therefore permits adaptation of conventional (geographically-based) animal disease control measures. The basic measure of economic efficiency was incremental change in net national income at opportunity cost. Local livelihood contributions were also measured.
  • Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA

    Suich, H., Busch, J. and Barbancho, N. 2005. Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA. Conservation International South Africa, Paper No. 4

    The Kavango–Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade. Recently, the idea has been revitalised by the ministers of those five countries, who seek to establish a world-class transfrontier conservation area and tourism destination in the Okavango and Zambezi river basin regions of those countries, within the context of sustainable development.
  • Elephant Distribution and Abundance in the Caprivi Strip: Results of an Aerial Survey in 2003

     Griffin, C.R. and Chase, M.J. 2004. Elephant Distribution and Abundance in the Caprivi Strip: Results of an Aerial Survey in 2003. Conservation International. Final Report, January 23, 2004. Submitted to Ministry of Environment and Tourism

  • Elephant Distribution and Abundance in the Lower Kwando River Basin and West Caprivi

     Chase, M.J. and Griffin, C.R. 2006. Elephant Distribution and Abundance in the Lower Kwando River Basin and West Caprivi

    During October and November 2005, we conducted aerial surveys over the Lower Kwando River Basin (LKRB) and the West Caprivi to determine elephant distribution and abundance. This region offers the best potential for restoring elephant and other wildlife populations into the conservation areas of southeast Angola and southwest Zambia.
  • Fish and livelihoods: Fisheries on the eastern floodplains, Caprivi

    Purvis, J. 2002. Fish and livelihoods: Fisheries on the eastern floodplains, Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 52, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The paper outlines the production system on the eastern floodplains in the Caprivi paying special attention to the fishing activities. Although there are already some indications that the resource may be overfished, this paper suggests that the situation could become much worse if the current trends continue - continued weakening of the influence of the traditional management systems; increasing availability of fishing inputs; market demand and prices for fish remain strong; and worsening problems in the agricultural sector (e.g. withdrawal of government subsidies for certain inputs, increasing incidence of wildlife/human conflicts, marketing problems). This paper calls for, among other things, further work to investigate the options and feasibility of developing some type of co-management regime (involving fisherfolk, government and other stakeholders in the management of the fishery) to ensure that the fishery is managed sustainably and continues to play an important role in the floodplain livelihood system.
  • Fish populations, gill net catches and gill net selectivity in the Kwando River, Namibia

    Næsje, T.F., Hay, C.J., Nickanor, N., Koekemoer, J.H., Strand, R., and Thorstad, E.B. 2004. Fish populations, gill net catches and gill net selectivity in the Kwando River, Namibia. - NINA Project Report 27. 64pp.

    The objective of this report is to provide baseline information about the fish resources in the Namibian part of the Kwando River to form the biological foundation for recommendations for a sustainable management of the fish resources. Based on fish survey data from the period 1997-1999, the fish resources are described through studies of species diversity, relative importance of the different species, life history parameters, catch per unit effort and gill net selectivity.
  • Fish Ranching Programme in Caprivi Region

     Murphy, C. and Lilungwe, P. 2012. Fish Ranching Programme in Caprivi Region. Integrated co-management of the Zambezi/Chobe River Fisheries Resources Project. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase II/5

    The Caprivi Region is well supplied with natural pans and ponds and has numerous old "borrow pits" left from past road construction activities. This makes the Region suited to fish ranching that uses ponds stocked with fingerling to grow larger fish. Such ponds can be either ephemeral, where fish need to be stocked annually and harvested a few months later when the ponds start to dry out, or semi-permanent, where stocking can be less frequent provided naturally produced fingerlings are left in the ponds when harvesting of the larger fish takes place. From 2007, NGOs assisted local people to develop fish ranching activities at 30 sites in Caprivi. This is the only project of this nature in Namibia and has the distinct advantage over fish farming is that inputs are very low (mainly labour to clear ponds of unwanted plants and fish species, feeding with any garden or food waste and harvesting). The existing fish ranching initiative is viable. Annual records from half of the existing ponds show that the commercial value of fish harvested would be about a quarter of a million Namibian Dollars, if the fish had been sold at the Katima Market. As most of the harvest from the fish ranching was consumed locally, this is an amount that people potentially saved in not having to buy food to eat. As Mr Tsukhani from Machita said, "If the fish ranching project continues, our sons will eat". An estimated sales figure from the actual fish sold at all the fish ranching sites in one year was about N$ 40 000. Some of this fish sales income was reinvested in the fish ranching business through the purchase of fishing equipment (e.g. hooks were bought at Lyanzoka) or fish food (e.g. bran at Machita). Other income was invested in education. At Machita village, the fish pond committee opened a Nampost account with the N$ 1 500 they earned from selling big fish and also fingerlings to a neighbour. Most of this fish ranching income (N$ 1 000) was spent on school funds and uniforms for 22 orphans. The price for fish in Caprivi is high (N$ 10/kg at source or N$ 20/kg Katima Market) and market forces have the potential to provide the incentive for continued management of fish ranching at the community level.
  • Flora, fauna and conservation of East Caprivi wetlands

     Schlettwein, C.H.G., Simmons, R.E., Macdonals, A. and Grobler, H.J.W. 1991. Flora, fauna and conservation of East Caprivi wetlands. Madoqua, 17(2): 67-76

    The largest natural permanent surface waters in Namibia occur in the wetlands of East Caprivi and are fed by two of Namibia's five perennial rivers.
  • Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi 2010

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi 2010

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi; dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2009, population estimates and trends.
  • Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi 2010: conservancies only

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi 2010: conservancies only

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi (conservancies only); dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2009, population estimates and trends.
  • Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi: map of live sightings

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi: map of live sightings

    Maps showing live sightings of elephant, giraffe, kudu, roan, sable, buffalo, impala, reedbuck, tsessebe and zebra in the 2010 Caprivi game count
  • Lake Liambezi, Namibia: fishing community assumes management responsibility, July 2011

     Tweddle, D., Weyl, O.L.F., Hay, C.J., Peel, R.A. and Shapumba, N. 2011. Lake Liambezi, Namibia: fishing community assumes management responsibility, July 2011. Integrated co-management of the Zambezi/Chobe River Fisheries Resources Project. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase II/4

    The Caprivi Region in Namibia is a narrow strip of land extending eastwards from the northeastern corner of the country, and is bordered by Angola and Zambia to the north, Botswana to the south and Zimbabwe to the east. The region is flat and characterised by numerous swamps and slow-flowing rivers. A major swamp system is centred on Lake Liambezi. This lake receives water from several sources. To the west, the Kwando River originates in the Angolan Highlands and forms the boundary between Angola and Zambia. Passing through the Caprivi Strip, the Kwando then percolates through the Linyanti swamps on the Namibia-Botswana border before feeding into Lake Liambezi. Rainfall and run-off from the area to the north of the lake also feed the lake. Floodwaters from the Zambezi enter the lake from the east during high flood years from two directions. The Chobe River reverses flow direction annually when the Zambezi floods and enters the lake from the southeast, while the Bukalo channel enters the northeast of the lake from the Caprivi floodplain. Outflow from the lake via the Chobe River when floodwaters recede is intermittent and dependent on lake level.
  • Living with wildlife – the story of Mudumu North Complex

    Living with wildlife – the story of Mudumu North Complex. NACSO. 20 pp.

    Profile booklet providing information on Mudumu North Complex with sections on resources and attractions, livelihoods and development, managing natural resources, Kwandu conservancy, Mashi conservancy, Mayuni conservancy, Sobbe conservancy, community forestry, the Kyaramacan association, the national parks, challenges, opportunities and the future.
  • Mudumu North Complex: Wildlife Co-Management in the Kwando Area of the Caprivi

    Martin, R.B. 2006. The Mudumu North Complex: Wildlife Co-Management in the Kwando Area of the Caprivi. A Study for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism and the Management Committee of the Mudumu North Complex

  • Postharvest fisheries on the eastern floodplains, Caprivi

     Purvis, J. 2002. Postharvest fisheries on the eastern floodplains, Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 51, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    With concerns regarding over-fishing in the Caprivi Region, the search for improvements in the fishery sector may lie in closer examination of the post-harvest sector. Opportunities need to be sought that emphasise maximising the benefits obtained from fish already caught. Improving the efficiency of post-harvest handling, processing and marketing can significantly improve the livelihoods of producers and traders. This paper describes the post-harvest marketing and distribution systems of fish on the eastern floodplains of the Caprivi region. A number of possible intervention points in the post-harvest chain are suggested, described and potential strengths and weaknesses of these interventions identified.
  • Profits, equity, growth and sustainability - The potential role of wildlife enterprises in Caprivi and other communal areas of Namibia

    Ashley, C., Barnes, J. and Healy, T. 1994. Profits, equity, growth and sustainability - The potential role of wildlife enterprises in Caprivi and other communal areas of Namibia. Research Discussion Paper No 02, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    Namibia is endowed with valuable wildlife resources. It already earns some economic benefit from them, mainly through tourism which is one of the fastest growing industries in Namibiarnand worldwide. However, at present, these earnings are below potential, particularly in communal areas where economic incentives for sustainable management have been stifled. As a result, the bulk of economic benefits of wildlife accrue to private enterprise and the government, with residents of communal areas largely excluded. Emerging economic data and comparisons with data from Botswana indicate that wildlife utilisation does have potential to address economic priorities in Namibia: it could provide significant economic and financial returns in communal areas such as Caprivi. With improved legal rights and skills for communities to manage and earn income from wildlife, it could be a valuable and significant complement to livestock keeping.
  • Results of a Crocodile Crocodylus niloticus survey in the river systems of north-east Namibia during August 2004

     Brown, C.J., Stander, P., Meyer-Rust, R. and Mayes, S. 2004. Results of a Crocodile Crocodylus niloticus survey in the river systems of north-east Namibia during August 2004

    This study has provided baseline data on crocodile numbers from aerial and spotlight counts. These data can be used with the results of future counts to determine population trends. The census has also provided information on their distribution of crocodiles in the Kavango and Caprivi regions. And third, it has resulted in the first population estimate for crocodiles in the north-east wetlands of Namibia.
  • Species management plan - Southern Reedbuck (Redunca arundinum arundinum), Common Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus), Red Lechwe (Kobus leche leche), Puku (Kobus vardoni)

     MET 2003. Species management plan - Southern Reedbuck (Redunca arundinum arundinum), Common Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus), Red Lechwe (Kobus leche leche), Puku (Kobus vardoni)

    The wetland grazer populations in the Caprivi have fluctuated over the past century from being relatively abundant to being near extinction. The fluctuations appear to be linked to long term rainfall cycles. Being on the fringe of larger populations in Botswana, they have usually been able to recover from low levels when the rainfall regime is favourable. Today, the population levels of all four species are a matter for concern: puku are almost extinct; waterbuck have been seen sporadically on surveys but, since 1994, there are no records exceeding 20 animals; lechwe have slumped from nearly 13,000 in 1980 to fewer than 200 now; and reedbuck numbers are about 200 at best.
  • Species management plan - Southern Savanna Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)

     MET 2002. Species management plan - Southern Savanna Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)

    Although not threatened at present, the Namibian buffalo population is well below the level at which it should exist. There is a potential range of some 10,000km2 available for buffalo in the Caprivi and this should carry at least 15,000 buffalo. Because of the high value of buffalo in the international safari hunting industry, the potential net income from wildlife in the Caprivi could be raised from its present level of US$2.5 million to US$7.5 million if the buffalo population was at carrying capacity.
  • Spotted hyaena ecology and human-wildlife conflict in the Caprivi Region of Namibia

     Hanssen, L. 2011. Spotted hyaena ecology and human-wildlife conflict in the Caprivi Region of Namibia. 2011 Research Report

  • Status of Wattled Cranes on the floodplains of north-east Namibia: results from an aerial survey during August 2004

     Brown, C.J., Stander, P., Mayes, S., Conradie, L., Haredoeb, P., Singwangwa, M. and Cilliers, W. 2004. Status of Wattled Cranes on the floodplains of north-east Namibia: results from an aerial survey during August 2004

    Areas surveyed: The Okavango River in Namibia, from just northwest the bridge on the Trans-Caprivi highway south to the Botswana border; the entire length of the Kwandu-Linyanti-Lake Liambezi-Chobe system, including the Mamili National Park; and the Zambezi river for its entire length on Namibia’s border, including parts of the adjacent East Caprivi floodplains.
  • Status of Wattled Cranes on the floodplains of north-east Namibia: results from an aerial survey during September 2007

     Brown, C. Chase, M., Nkala, T., Landen, K. and Aust, P. 2007. Status of Wattled Cranes on the floodplains of north-east Namibia: results from an aerial survey during September 2007

    The Okavango River in Namibia, from the Angolan border just northwest of the bridge on the Trans-Caprivi highway south to the Botswana border; the entire length of the Kwandu-Linyanti-Lake Liambezi-Chobe system, including the whole Mamili National Park; and the Zambezi River for its entire length on Namibia’s border, including parts of the adjacent East Caprivi floodplains, were survey from the air in September 2007.
  • The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi

    Mulonga, S., Suich, H. and Murphy, C. 2003. The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 59, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The Caprivi Region is one region in Namibia where the community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) programme has achieved considerable success, in terms of capacity building and natural resource management. However, the conflict between people and wildlife is perceived by local residents to have worsened since the advent of the CBNRM programme. This paper forms part of the WILD Project research, which is a Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) participatory research project investigating the change that the Namibian CBNRM programme has brought to people\'s livelihoods.
  • Wildlife census of Namibia's North East Rivers - 2009

    Wildlife census of Namibia's North East Rivers - 2009

    The third aerial wildlife census of the Caprivi and Kavango river systems in Namibia took place during September 2009. These surveys cover the Kavango, Kwando, Linyanti, Chobe and Zambezi Rivers and their associated wetlands and floodplains. The area (~18,000 km2) is surrounded by Angola, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe, lying between the Okavango River in the west, and the Zambezi and Chobe Rivers in the east. The Okavango, Kwando, Linyanti and Zambezi rivers provide perennial water.
  • Wildlife resources in the Caprivi, Namibia. The Results of an Aerial Census in 1994 and Comparisons with Past Surveys

     Rodwell, T.C., Tagg. J. and Grobler. M. 1995. Wildlife resources in the Caprivi, Namibia. The Results of an Aerial Census in 1994 and Comparisons with Past Surveys. Research Discussion Paper No 9, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    Protected and proclaimed areas in the Caprivi, Namibia, hold most of the economically valuable wildlife species in that region. This wildlife is presently being viewed as a potential resource base to support the many community-based conservation and development programmes in the Caprivi.
  • Winter counts of wetland and floodplain birds in the Kwando River and floodplain system, Caprivi

    Brown, C.J and Meyer-Rust, R. 2004. Winter counts of wetland and floodplain birds in the Kwando River and floodplain system, Caprivi

    Human and, increasingly, elephant pressure on Namibia’s wetlands and riparian belts are a major cause of conservation concern. Many wetland birds are listed in Namibia’s Red Data Book (Simmons & Brown in prep) because of population declines caused by the degradation and destruction of wetland habitats, and because of high levels of disturbance. Good information on the status of major wetlands and their avifauna is important for their conservation management. Birds provide one of the best indicators of wetland health. That is why wetland bird counts are such an important part of Namibia’s environmental monitoring system.

Relevant literature

  • Assessment of Non-Wood forest products in eastern Caprivi. Community Forest in North-Eastern Namibia

    Assessment of Non-Wood forest products in eastern Caprivi. Community Forest in North-Eastern Namibia. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry

    Assessment of Non-Wood forest products in eastern Caprivi
  • Caprivi State Forest - The Forest Resource

    Caprivi State Forest - The Forest Resource (From Forest Inventory). Namibia-Finland Forestry Programme

  • Flora, fauna and conservation of East Caprivi wetlands

     Schlettwein, C.H.G., Simmons, R.E., Macdonals, A. and Grobler, H.J.W. 1991. Flora, fauna and conservation of East Caprivi wetlands. Madoqua, 17(2): 67-76

    The largest natural permanent surface waters in Namibia occur in the wetlands of East Caprivi and are fed by two of Namibia's five perennial rivers.
  • Forest inventory report of Caprivi Region

     Chakanga, M., Korhonen, K. and Selänniemi, T. 1998. Forest inventory report of Caprivi Region. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry, Namibia-Finland Forestry Programme

  • Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Kwandu Community Forest

    Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Kwandu Community Forest

  • Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Lubuta Community Forest

    Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Lubuta Community Forest

  • Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Masida Community Forest

    Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Masida Community Forest

  • Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Sachona

    Government Gazette. Declaration of an area as a Community Forest: Cuma, Gcwatjinga, George Mukoya, Kahenge, Katope, Likwaterera, Marienfluss, Muduva Nyangana, Nyae Nyae, Okondjombo, Ohepi, Omufituwekuta, Orupembe, Oshaampula, Otjiu-West, Puros, Sachona, Sanitatas, Zilitene

  • Living with wildlife – the story of Mudumu North Complex

    Living with wildlife – the story of Mudumu North Complex. NACSO. 20 pp.

    Profile booklet providing information on Mudumu North Complex with sections on resources and attractions, livelihoods and development, managing natural resources, Kwandu conservancy, Mashi conservancy, Mayuni conservancy, Sobbe conservancy, community forestry, the Kyaramacan association, the national parks, challenges, opportunities and the future.
  • Marketing study for non-timber forest products for the north eastern regions of Namibia (Eastern Caprivi and Eastern Kavango).

     Cole, D. 2003. Marketing study for non-timber forest products for the north eastern regions of Namibia (Eastern Caprivi and Eastern Kavango). The Namibia-Finland Forestry Programme

  • People, plants and landscapes: A review and recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia

    Cunningham, A.B. 2007. People, plants and landscapes: A review and recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia.

    This report, written for the Integrated Community Ecosystem Management (ICEMA)/French Fund for Global Environment (FFEM) project, reviews and makes recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia. As the driest country in sub-equatorial Africa, with an economy based largely on its natural resource assets (farming, mining, fishing and tourism focused on wildlife), Namibia faces major challenges. With policy support, it can also grasp good opportunities related to high value plant species. A focus on high value plant species is timely.
  • Plant resources & monitoring. Follow up report and recommendations on further integration of high value plant species into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia

    Cunningham, AB. 2008. Plant resources & monitoring. Follow up report and recommendations on further integration of high value plant species into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia. A report for the Integrated Community Ecosystem Management (ICEMA)/French Fund for Global Environment (FFEM) Project

  • Woody Resources Report of Kwando Community Forest

    Kamwi, J.M. 2003. Woody Resources Report of Kwando Community Forest. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry. Namibia-Finland Forestry Programme


Relevant literature

  • A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions

    A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions. Final Report. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry, National Remote Sensing Center. Report for Lux-Development SA

    A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions.
  • A strategic management plan for Mudumu Landscape 2012 - 2015

    A strategic management plan for Mudumu Landscape 2012 - 2015

    This document sets out a Strategic Management Plan for the Mudumu Landscape, Caprivi Region, Namibia. The plan builds on a number of existing management plans that have been developed for different management units within the landscape. These include the management plans of conservancies, community forests, the Mudumu North Complex (MNC), the Mudumu South Complex (MSC), the Five-year Strategic Plan for the Mudumu Landscape Association, and the Kwando-Linyanti Integrated Tourism Development Plan. The Landscape Strategic Management Plan addresses key threats to biodiversity and addresses the human and social dimensions of conservation in an area where people are mostly poor and dependent upon the land and its natural resources for their livelihoods.
    » Download
  • Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA

    Suich, H., Busch, J. and Barbancho, N. 2005. Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA. Conservation International South Africa, Paper No. 4

    The Kavango–Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade. Recently, the idea has been revitalised by the ministers of those five countries, who seek to establish a world-class transfrontier conservation area and tourism destination in the Okavango and Zambezi river basin regions of those countries, within the context of sustainable development.
  • Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) - Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin

     Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry. Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) - Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin

    The Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin is located in the north-eastern part of Namibia stretching across the entire Caprivi region. The basin rivers form borders with Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana in the north and east respectively.
  • Lake Liambezi, Namibia: fishing community assumes management responsibility, July 2011

     Tweddle, D., Weyl, O.L.F., Hay, C.J., Peel, R.A. and Shapumba, N. 2011. Lake Liambezi, Namibia: fishing community assumes management responsibility, July 2011. Integrated co-management of the Zambezi/Chobe River Fisheries Resources Project. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase II/4

    The Caprivi Region in Namibia is a narrow strip of land extending eastwards from the northeastern corner of the country, and is bordered by Angola and Zambia to the north, Botswana to the south and Zimbabwe to the east. The region is flat and characterised by numerous swamps and slow-flowing rivers. A major swamp system is centred on Lake Liambezi. This lake receives water from several sources. To the west, the Kwando River originates in the Angolan Highlands and forms the boundary between Angola and Zambia. Passing through the Caprivi Strip, the Kwando then percolates through the Linyanti swamps on the Namibia-Botswana border before feeding into Lake Liambezi. Rainfall and run-off from the area to the north of the lake also feed the lake. Floodwaters from the Zambezi enter the lake from the east during high flood years from two directions. The Chobe River reverses flow direction annually when the Zambezi floods and enters the lake from the southeast, while the Bukalo channel enters the northeast of the lake from the Caprivi floodplain. Outflow from the lake via the Chobe River when floodwaters recede is intermittent and dependent on lake level.
  • Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    Jones, B.T.B. 2008. Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area. Final Report

    This report has been commissioned in order to provide a foundation for the Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area (TFCA) countries to consider policy and legal harmonisation regarding the management of natural resources. The KAZA participating countries are Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
  • Mudumu Landscape semi-controlled landfill site simplified waste disposal site design

    Mudumu Landscape semi-controlled landfill site simplified waste disposal site design

    This report outlines the design objectives and considerations that need to be taken into account in the design of a landfill. Management systems for the control of leachate and groundwater as well as the operations and maintenance are discussed
    » Download
  • Mudumu North Complex: Wildlife Co-Management in the Kwando Area of the Caprivi

    Martin, R.B. 2006. The Mudumu North Complex: Wildlife Co-Management in the Kwando Area of the Caprivi. A Study for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism and the Management Committee of the Mudumu North Complex

  • People, plants and landscapes: A review and recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia

    Cunningham, A.B. 2007. People, plants and landscapes: A review and recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia.

    This report, written for the Integrated Community Ecosystem Management (ICEMA)/French Fund for Global Environment (FFEM) project, reviews and makes recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia. As the driest country in sub-equatorial Africa, with an economy based largely on its natural resource assets (farming, mining, fishing and tourism focused on wildlife), Namibia faces major challenges. With policy support, it can also grasp good opportunities related to high value plant species. A focus on high value plant species is timely.
  • Plant resources & monitoring. Follow up report and recommendations on further integration of high value plant species into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia

    Cunningham, AB. 2008. Plant resources & monitoring. Follow up report and recommendations on further integration of high value plant species into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia. A report for the Integrated Community Ecosystem Management (ICEMA)/French Fund for Global Environment (FFEM) Project

  • Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan

     Brown, C.J. and Jones, B.T.B. (ed.)1994. Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan. Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Wildlife, Conservation and Tourism, Namibia

    Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan.
  • Species management plan - Southern Reedbuck (Redunca arundinum arundinum), Common Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus), Red Lechwe (Kobus leche leche), Puku (Kobus vardoni)

     MET 2003. Species management plan - Southern Reedbuck (Redunca arundinum arundinum), Common Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus), Red Lechwe (Kobus leche leche), Puku (Kobus vardoni)

    The wetland grazer populations in the Caprivi have fluctuated over the past century from being relatively abundant to being near extinction. The fluctuations appear to be linked to long term rainfall cycles. Being on the fringe of larger populations in Botswana, they have usually been able to recover from low levels when the rainfall regime is favourable. Today, the population levels of all four species are a matter for concern: puku are almost extinct; waterbuck have been seen sporadically on surveys but, since 1994, there are no records exceeding 20 animals; lechwe have slumped from nearly 13,000 in 1980 to fewer than 200 now; and reedbuck numbers are about 200 at best.
  • Species management plan - Southern Savanna Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)

     MET 2002. Species management plan - Southern Savanna Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)

    Although not threatened at present, the Namibian buffalo population is well below the level at which it should exist. There is a potential range of some 10,000km2 available for buffalo in the Caprivi and this should carry at least 15,000 buffalo. Because of the high value of buffalo in the international safari hunting industry, the potential net income from wildlife in the Caprivi could be raised from its present level of US$2.5 million to US$7.5 million if the buffalo population was at carrying capacity.
  • Spotted hyaena ecology and human-wildlife conflict in the Caprivi Region of Namibia

     Hanssen, L. 2011. Spotted hyaena ecology and human-wildlife conflict in the Caprivi Region of Namibia. 2011 Research Report

  • The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi

    Mulonga, S., Suich, H. and Murphy, C. 2003. The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 59, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The Caprivi Region is one region in Namibia where the community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) programme has achieved considerable success, in terms of capacity building and natural resource management. However, the conflict between people and wildlife is perceived by local residents to have worsened since the advent of the CBNRM programme. This paper forms part of the WILD Project research, which is a Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) participatory research project investigating the change that the Namibian CBNRM programme has brought to people\'s livelihoods.
  • Waste management implementation plan for Mudumu Landscape

    Waste management implementation plan for Mudumu Landscape

    Waste management has been identified as one of the problems in the landscape that need urgent attention. Uncontrolled dumping of waste is common in the landscape. This is mainly due to the fact that there is no designated central waste disposal site. The NAM-PLACE Project has therefore appointed SED Consultancy to assist the ML with the design of a new waste disposal site and the development of a Waste Management Implementation Plan. This plan provides a synopsis of the current waste management practices in the ML and presents recommended initiatives to promote sustainable and integrated waste management in the landscape. The plan also promotes the effective use of the proposed waste disposal site and allocates responsibilities to all stakeholders in the action plan.
    » Download

Relevant literature

  • "The person with the idea for the campsite is a hero." Institutional arrangements and livelihood change regarding community-owned tourism enterprises in Namibia (Case studies from Caprivi and Kavango Regions)

     Murphy, C. and Halstead, L. 2003. "The person with the idea for the campsite is a hero." Institutional arrangements and livelihood change regarding community-owned tourism enterprises in Namibia (Case studies from Caprivi and Kavango Regions). Research Discussion Paper No 61, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The Namibian CBNRM programme is based on the premise that communities will receive direct benefits through the protection and sustainable use of common property natural resources. Workshop data reveals that people responsible for the establishment and management of the COT enterprises are making the link between benefits from the enterprises and improved natural resource management. This paper focuses on understanding the institutional aspects of the enterprises and how these institutions have shaped the impact of the enterprises on people's livelihoods.
  • A Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Contribution of Fishing Lodges in the Caprivi Region to the Local Economy

    2010. A Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Contribution of Fishing Lodges in the Caprivi Region to the Local Economy.

    A survey was carried out in 2009 in the Caprivi region of Namibia to establish the economic benefits that fishing lodges bring to local communities and the local economy. Five fishing lodges were surveyed and estimates for costs, revenues and fish catch were determined. These estimates were in turn used to inform an economic model designed to provide estimates for the net benefits of the operations.
  • A Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Contribution of Fishing Lodges in the Caprivi Region to the Local Economy, April 2010

    Sweeney, L., Baker, A., Thaniseb, A., Brown, C., Tweddle, D., Hay, C. and van der Waal, B. 2010. A Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Contribution of Fishing Lodges in the Caprivi Region to the Local Economy, April 2010. Integrated co-management of the Zambezi/Chobe River Fisheries Resources Project. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase II/1

    A survey was carried out in 2009 in the Caprivi region of Namibia to establish the economic benefits that fishing lodges bring to local communities and the local economy. Five fishing lodges were surveyed and estimates for costs, revenues and fish catch were determined. These estimates were in turn used to inform an economic model designed to provide estimates for the net benefits of the operations. The model itself was derived from an economic model designed by Barnes (2006), which was used to assess the economic impact of tourist lodges more generally in the Caprivi region. In addition to the quantitative survey, a qualitative survey was carried out to assess the current working relationships between lodges and local communities. The results of the quantitative survey indicate that on average fish lodges generate around N$1.80 million total financial benefit per lodge per annum (N$852,000 net economic benefit), equating to N$1,479 per kg of fish caught and not released or N$1,563 per tourist per annum. It is estimated that N$1.11 million of this total is generated on average in the form of wages, with N$1.06 million wages directly paid to members of the local community. This compares very favourably with the income generated from the "nextbest" activity for the area, local fishing, which was estimated to generate (for the equivalent number of employees) a maximum of N$604,000 total financial benefit per annum (N$412,000 net economic benefit) from fish sales. This equates to revenue of N$11 per kg of fish, or less than 1% of the value of the fish caught and not released with fish lodges.
  • Crafty women: The livelihood impact of craft income in Caprivi

     Suich, H. and Murphy, C. 2002. Crafty women: The livelihood impact of craft income in Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 48, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    This paper analyses the Rossing Foundation craft purchase data paid out to individual crafters in Caprivi between June 1998 and the end of 2001 and reviews the livelihood impact of this money. The most important crafts in this commercialisation have been woven products (particularly open palm baskets, but also other woven items and grass and reed mats), wood carvings and clay pots. The majority of the craft makers in the region live in rural areas, and while wood carving appears to be the domain of men, weaving and pottery is carried out almost exclusively by women.
  • Economic Analysis of Land Use Policies for Livestock, Wildlife and Disease Management in Caprivi, Namibia, with Potential Wider Implications for Regional Transfrontier Conservation Areas

    Barnes, J.I. 2013. Economic Analysis of Land Use Policies for Livestock, Wildlife and Disease Management in Caprivi, Namibia, with Potential Wider Implications for Regional Transfrontier Conservation Areas. Technical Report to the Wildlife Conservation Society’s AHEAD Program and the World Wildlife Fund

    Standard cost-benefit analysis was applied to several future policy options for land use and animal disease management in Caprivi, Namibia. Emphasis was placed on the livestock-wildlife interface and Caprivi's role as central to the Kavango Zambezi (KAZA) transfrontier conservation area (TFCA). Empirically-based enterprise models measuring private and economic values for livestock and wildlife sectors in Caprivi were used to measure returns to investment for policy options regarding animal disease management and land use allocation. Options included commodity-based trade (CBT) and veterinary control fencing approaches to animal disease management. CBT is a production and marketing approach, which assures product safety regardless of the disease status of the area of origin and therefore permits adaptation of conventional (geographically-based) animal disease control measures. The basic measure of economic efficiency was incremental change in net national income at opportunity cost. Local livelihood contributions were also measured.
  • Faites vos jeux! Interests and socio-economic development in the Caprivi Region from a historical perspective

     Zeller, W. 2000. Faites vos jeux! Interests and socio-economic development in the Caprivi Region from a historical perspective

  • Fish and livelihoods: Fisheries on the eastern floodplains, Caprivi

    Purvis, J. 2002. Fish and livelihoods: Fisheries on the eastern floodplains, Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 52, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The paper outlines the production system on the eastern floodplains in the Caprivi paying special attention to the fishing activities. Although there are already some indications that the resource may be overfished, this paper suggests that the situation could become much worse if the current trends continue - continued weakening of the influence of the traditional management systems; increasing availability of fishing inputs; market demand and prices for fish remain strong; and worsening problems in the agricultural sector (e.g. withdrawal of government subsidies for certain inputs, increasing incidence of wildlife/human conflicts, marketing problems). This paper calls for, among other things, further work to investigate the options and feasibility of developing some type of co-management regime (involving fisherfolk, government and other stakeholders in the management of the fishery) to ensure that the fishery is managed sustainably and continues to play an important role in the floodplain livelihood system.
  • Fish Ranching Programme in Caprivi Region

     Murphy, C. and Lilungwe, P. 2012. Fish Ranching Programme in Caprivi Region. Integrated co-management of the Zambezi/Chobe River Fisheries Resources Project. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase II/5

    The Caprivi Region is well supplied with natural pans and ponds and has numerous old "borrow pits" left from past road construction activities. This makes the Region suited to fish ranching that uses ponds stocked with fingerling to grow larger fish. Such ponds can be either ephemeral, where fish need to be stocked annually and harvested a few months later when the ponds start to dry out, or semi-permanent, where stocking can be less frequent provided naturally produced fingerlings are left in the ponds when harvesting of the larger fish takes place. From 2007, NGOs assisted local people to develop fish ranching activities at 30 sites in Caprivi. This is the only project of this nature in Namibia and has the distinct advantage over fish farming is that inputs are very low (mainly labour to clear ponds of unwanted plants and fish species, feeding with any garden or food waste and harvesting). The existing fish ranching initiative is viable. Annual records from half of the existing ponds show that the commercial value of fish harvested would be about a quarter of a million Namibian Dollars, if the fish had been sold at the Katima Market. As most of the harvest from the fish ranching was consumed locally, this is an amount that people potentially saved in not having to buy food to eat. As Mr Tsukhani from Machita said, "If the fish ranching project continues, our sons will eat". An estimated sales figure from the actual fish sold at all the fish ranching sites in one year was about N$ 40 000. Some of this fish sales income was reinvested in the fish ranching business through the purchase of fishing equipment (e.g. hooks were bought at Lyanzoka) or fish food (e.g. bran at Machita). Other income was invested in education. At Machita village, the fish pond committee opened a Nampost account with the N$ 1 500 they earned from selling big fish and also fingerlings to a neighbour. Most of this fish ranching income (N$ 1 000) was spent on school funds and uniforms for 22 orphans. The price for fish in Caprivi is high (N$ 10/kg at source or N$ 20/kg Katima Market) and market forces have the potential to provide the incentive for continued management of fish ranching at the community level.
  • Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    Jones, B.T.B. 2008. Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area. Final Report

    This report has been commissioned in order to provide a foundation for the Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area (TFCA) countries to consider policy and legal harmonisation regarding the management of natural resources. The KAZA participating countries are Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
  • Livelihood strategies of rural households in Caprivi: Implications for conservancies and natural resource management

    Ashley, C. and LaFranchi, C. 1997. Livelihood strategies of rural households in Caprivi: Implications for conservancies and natural resource management. Research Discussion Paper No 20, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism

    This paper examines how rural Caprivians secure their livelihoods, in order to understand how wildlife and other community based natural resource management (CBNRM) initiatives can 'fit in' to current activities and the rural economy. It considers the wide range of resource uses and livelihood strategies employed by rural households: crop production, livestock, wage employment and cash remittances, harvesting of trees, plants and river resources, and wildlife/tourism enterprises. It then assesses how different households combine these various activities, and identifies the main factors affecting their options and choices. Wildlife and other community based natural resource management (CBNRM) initiatives can 'fit in' to current activities and the rural economy. The livelihoods and priorities of different types of households are assessed, and the many positive and negative impacts of CBNRM initiatives identified. The aim is to understand wildlife and CBNRM from householders' perspectives, and recommend how conservancies, and other natural resource management initiatives can be implemented in ways that maximise the positive impacts to rural livelihoods and minimise the negative impacts.
  • Living with wildlife – the story of Mudumu North Complex

    Living with wildlife – the story of Mudumu North Complex. NACSO. 20 pp.

    Profile booklet providing information on Mudumu North Complex with sections on resources and attractions, livelihoods and development, managing natural resources, Kwandu conservancy, Mashi conservancy, Mayuni conservancy, Sobbe conservancy, community forestry, the Kyaramacan association, the national parks, challenges, opportunities and the future.
  • Making community-based tourism work: An assessment of factors contributing to successful community-owned tourism development in Caprivi, Namibia

     Halstead, L. 2003. Making community-based tourism work: An assessment of factors contributing to successful community-owned tourism development in Caprivi, Namibia. Research Discussion Paper No 60, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    This study investigates why many community-based tourism enterprises in Namibia have experienced difficulties in remaining operational or maintaining standards necessary for attracting tourists, while others have achieved various levels of success.
  • Mashi Craft Market - Crafts and Livelihoods in Caprivi

    Murphy, C. and Suich, H. 2003. Mashi Craft Market - Crafts and Livelihoods in Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 57, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation (IRDNC) works with crafters mainly from western East Caprivi, near Kongola, and West Caprivi and supports the Mashi Craft Market (MCM). This paper analyses the Mashi Craft Market purchase and sales data for individual crafters in Caprivi over three years, from 1999 to 2001, and reviews the livelihood impact of this money.
  • People, plants and landscapes: A review and recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia

    Cunningham, A.B. 2007. People, plants and landscapes: A review and recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia.

    This report, written for the Integrated Community Ecosystem Management (ICEMA)/French Fund for Global Environment (FFEM) project, reviews and makes recommendations for further integration of high value plant species (HVPS) into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia. As the driest country in sub-equatorial Africa, with an economy based largely on its natural resource assets (farming, mining, fishing and tourism focused on wildlife), Namibia faces major challenges. With policy support, it can also grasp good opportunities related to high value plant species. A focus on high value plant species is timely.
  • Plant resources & monitoring. Follow up report and recommendations on further integration of high value plant species into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia

    Cunningham, AB. 2008. Plant resources & monitoring. Follow up report and recommendations on further integration of high value plant species into Community Ecosystem Management in Namibia. A report for the Integrated Community Ecosystem Management (ICEMA)/French Fund for Global Environment (FFEM) Project

  • Profits, equity, growth and sustainability - The potential role of wildlife enterprises in Caprivi and other communal areas of Namibia

    Ashley, C., Barnes, J. and Healy, T. 1994. Profits, equity, growth and sustainability - The potential role of wildlife enterprises in Caprivi and other communal areas of Namibia. Research Discussion Paper No 02, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    Namibia is endowed with valuable wildlife resources. It already earns some economic benefit from them, mainly through tourism which is one of the fastest growing industries in Namibiarnand worldwide. However, at present, these earnings are below potential, particularly in communal areas where economic incentives for sustainable management have been stifled. As a result, the bulk of economic benefits of wildlife accrue to private enterprise and the government, with residents of communal areas largely excluded. Emerging economic data and comparisons with data from Botswana indicate that wildlife utilisation does have potential to address economic priorities in Namibia: it could provide significant economic and financial returns in communal areas such as Caprivi. With improved legal rights and skills for communities to manage and earn income from wildlife, it could be a valuable and significant complement to livestock keeping.
  • Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan

     Brown, C.J. and Jones, B.T.B. (ed.)1994. Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan. Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Wildlife, Conservation and Tourism, Namibia

    Results of a socio-ecological survey of the West Caprivi Strip, Namibia: A strategic community-based environment and development plan.
  • The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi

    Mulonga, S., Suich, H. and Murphy, C. 2003. The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 59, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The Caprivi Region is one region in Namibia where the community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) programme has achieved considerable success, in terms of capacity building and natural resource management. However, the conflict between people and wildlife is perceived by local residents to have worsened since the advent of the CBNRM programme. This paper forms part of the WILD Project research, which is a Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) participatory research project investigating the change that the Namibian CBNRM programme has brought to people\'s livelihoods.
  • The ecological, social & economic implications of private game parks & private nature reserves in Namibia

    The ecological, social & economic implications of private game parks & private nature reserves in Namibia

    The Ministry of Environment & Tourism commissioned this study into the ecological, social, and economic implications of private game parks and nature reserves in Namibia. The Ministry engaged the services of an independent team of researchers consisting of an ecologist, an economist and a lawyer.
    » Download
  • Wild food: Use of natural resources for food in eastern Caprivi

    Mulonga, S. 2003. Wild food: Use of natural resources for food in eastern Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 62, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The research was conducted in Salambala and Mayuni Conservancy and at Linyanti, which is a non-conservancy area. The main objective of the study was to look at the use of wild food resources by people as a livelihood activity in rural areas in Caprivi and the factors influencing the use of these resources.

Relevant literature

  • A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions

    A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions. Final Report. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry, National Remote Sensing Center. Report for Lux-Development SA

    A local operational tool for fire Monitoring and Management for the Kavango and Caprivi Regions.
  • Fish and livelihoods: Fisheries on the eastern floodplains, Caprivi

    Purvis, J. 2002. Fish and livelihoods: Fisheries on the eastern floodplains, Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 52, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The paper outlines the production system on the eastern floodplains in the Caprivi paying special attention to the fishing activities. Although there are already some indications that the resource may be overfished, this paper suggests that the situation could become much worse if the current trends continue - continued weakening of the influence of the traditional management systems; increasing availability of fishing inputs; market demand and prices for fish remain strong; and worsening problems in the agricultural sector (e.g. withdrawal of government subsidies for certain inputs, increasing incidence of wildlife/human conflicts, marketing problems). This paper calls for, among other things, further work to investigate the options and feasibility of developing some type of co-management regime (involving fisherfolk, government and other stakeholders in the management of the fishery) to ensure that the fishery is managed sustainably and continues to play an important role in the floodplain livelihood system.
  • Mudumu Landscape semi-controlled landfill site simplified waste disposal site design

    Mudumu Landscape semi-controlled landfill site simplified waste disposal site design

    This report outlines the design objectives and considerations that need to be taken into account in the design of a landfill. Management systems for the control of leachate and groundwater as well as the operations and maintenance are discussed
    » Download
  • Namibia Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment

    Ministry of Environment and Tourism. 2008. Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Namibia. Final Report

    Vulnerability and Adaptation assessment to climate change carried out in preparation of the Second National Communication in meeting Government’s obligations to the UNFCCC. The report addresses the vulnerability of the water and agricultural sectors to climate change, and suggest adaptation measures to cope with the expected impacts. Vulnerability is placed in the socio-economic contexts of rural areas, in particular the Karas and Caprivi regions.
    » Download
  • Spotted hyaena ecology and human-wildlife conflict in the Caprivi Region of Namibia

     Hanssen, L. 2011. Spotted hyaena ecology and human-wildlife conflict in the Caprivi Region of Namibia. 2011 Research Report

  • The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi

    Mulonga, S., Suich, H. and Murphy, C. 2003. The conflict continues: Human wildlife conflict and livelihoods in Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 59, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The Caprivi Region is one region in Namibia where the community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) programme has achieved considerable success, in terms of capacity building and natural resource management. However, the conflict between people and wildlife is perceived by local residents to have worsened since the advent of the CBNRM programme. This paper forms part of the WILD Project research, which is a Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) participatory research project investigating the change that the Namibian CBNRM programme has brought to people\'s livelihoods.
  • Waste management implementation plan for Mudumu Landscape

    Waste management implementation plan for Mudumu Landscape

    Waste management has been identified as one of the problems in the landscape that need urgent attention. Uncontrolled dumping of waste is common in the landscape. This is mainly due to the fact that there is no designated central waste disposal site. The NAM-PLACE Project has therefore appointed SED Consultancy to assist the ML with the design of a new waste disposal site and the development of a Waste Management Implementation Plan. This plan provides a synopsis of the current waste management practices in the ML and presents recommended initiatives to promote sustainable and integrated waste management in the landscape. The plan also promotes the effective use of the proposed waste disposal site and allocates responsibilities to all stakeholders in the action plan.
    » Download

Relevant literature

  • A Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Contribution of Fishing Lodges in the Caprivi Region to the Local Economy

    2010. A Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Contribution of Fishing Lodges in the Caprivi Region to the Local Economy.

    A survey was carried out in 2009 in the Caprivi region of Namibia to establish the economic benefits that fishing lodges bring to local communities and the local economy. Five fishing lodges were surveyed and estimates for costs, revenues and fish catch were determined. These estimates were in turn used to inform an economic model designed to provide estimates for the net benefits of the operations.
  • A Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Contribution of Fishing Lodges in the Caprivi Region to the Local Economy, April 2010

    Sweeney, L., Baker, A., Thaniseb, A., Brown, C., Tweddle, D., Hay, C. and van der Waal, B. 2010. A Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Contribution of Fishing Lodges in the Caprivi Region to the Local Economy, April 2010. Integrated co-management of the Zambezi/Chobe River Fisheries Resources Project. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase II/1

    A survey was carried out in 2009 in the Caprivi region of Namibia to establish the economic benefits that fishing lodges bring to local communities and the local economy. Five fishing lodges were surveyed and estimates for costs, revenues and fish catch were determined. These estimates were in turn used to inform an economic model designed to provide estimates for the net benefits of the operations. The model itself was derived from an economic model designed by Barnes (2006), which was used to assess the economic impact of tourist lodges more generally in the Caprivi region. In addition to the quantitative survey, a qualitative survey was carried out to assess the current working relationships between lodges and local communities. The results of the quantitative survey indicate that on average fish lodges generate around N$1.80 million total financial benefit per lodge per annum (N$852,000 net economic benefit), equating to N$1,479 per kg of fish caught and not released or N$1,563 per tourist per annum. It is estimated that N$1.11 million of this total is generated on average in the form of wages, with N$1.06 million wages directly paid to members of the local community. This compares very favourably with the income generated from the "nextbest" activity for the area, local fishing, which was estimated to generate (for the equivalent number of employees) a maximum of N$604,000 total financial benefit per annum (N$412,000 net economic benefit) from fish sales. This equates to revenue of N$11 per kg of fish, or less than 1% of the value of the fish caught and not released with fish lodges.
  • Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA

    Suich, H., Busch, J. and Barbancho, N. 2005. Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA. Conservation International South Africa, Paper No. 4

    The Kavango–Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade. Recently, the idea has been revitalised by the ministers of those five countries, who seek to establish a world-class transfrontier conservation area and tourism destination in the Okavango and Zambezi river basin regions of those countries, within the context of sustainable development.
  • Making community-based tourism work: An assessment of factors contributing to successful community-owned tourism development in Caprivi, Namibia

     Halstead, L. 2003. Making community-based tourism work: An assessment of factors contributing to successful community-owned tourism development in Caprivi, Namibia. Research Discussion Paper No 60, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    This study investigates why many community-based tourism enterprises in Namibia have experienced difficulties in remaining operational or maintaining standards necessary for attracting tourists, while others have achieved various levels of success.
  • Strategic Environmental Assessment of the tourism sector for the Mudumu Landscape

    Strategic Environmental Assessment of the tourism sector for the Mudumu Landscape

    The SEA for the Mudumu tourism sector comprised consultations, a review of the existing literature and legal framework and a visit to the Mudumu Landscape.
    » Download
  • Tourism in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    Suich, H. 2005. Tourism in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    The Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of a major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade

Relevant literature

  • A Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Floods and Flood Impact in Eastern Caprivi, Namibia

     Mudabeti, A.M. 2011. A Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Floods and Flood Impact in Eastern Caprivi, Namibia. Degree of Master of Science (Geographical Information SCience and Systems) - Msc (GISc), Centre for Geoinformatics, Salzburg University

  • Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) - Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin

     Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry. Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) - Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin

    The Zambezi-Kwando-Linyanti River Basin is located in the north-eastern part of Namibia stretching across the entire Caprivi region. The basin rivers form borders with Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana in the north and east respectively.
  • Notes on a spatial assessment of the risk of flooding in eastern Caprivi

     Nathanael, B. and Mendelsohn, J. 2013. Notes on a spatial assessment of the risk of flooding in eastern Caprivi. RAISON (Research and Information Services of Namibia)

    RAISON was commissioned by WWF (Namibia) to produce a mapped assessment of the vulnerability of eastern Caprivi to flooding with the objective that such an assessment will improve planning. For example, much of flood damage could have been avoided and need for emergency relief measures improved if information on the risk of flooding had been available to plan the location of infrastructure and settlements. This information is particularly important as predictions are that climate change will affect flooding in this region.

Relevant literature

  • A digest of information on key aspects of Caprivi's geography

     Mendelsohn, J. 2007. A digest of information on key aspects of Caprivi's geography

    Many of Caprivi's opportunities and constraints are direct consequences of its position, as a remote part of Namibia and especially and as a result of its very central location in southern Africa. The region lies almost exactly half-way between the equator and the southern tip of Africa, as well as being half-way between the east and west coasts.
  • A strategic management plan for Mudumu Landscape 2012 - 2015

    A strategic management plan for Mudumu Landscape 2012 - 2015

    This document sets out a Strategic Management Plan for the Mudumu Landscape, Caprivi Region, Namibia. The plan builds on a number of existing management plans that have been developed for different management units within the landscape. These include the management plans of conservancies, community forests, the Mudumu North Complex (MNC), the Mudumu South Complex (MSC), the Five-year Strategic Plan for the Mudumu Landscape Association, and the Kwando-Linyanti Integrated Tourism Development Plan. The Landscape Strategic Management Plan addresses key threats to biodiversity and addresses the human and social dimensions of conservation in an area where people are mostly poor and dependent upon the land and its natural resources for their livelihoods.
    » Download
  • An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi: Chapters 1 - 2

    Mendelsohn J. and Roberts, C. 1997. An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Windhoek. [Chapters 1 - 2, including cover and prelims]

    An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi. Cover page to Chapter 2.
  • An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi: Chapters 3 - 5

    Mendelsohn J. and Roberts, C. 1997. An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Windhoek. [Chapters 3 - 5]

    An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi. Chapters 3 - 5
  • An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi: Chapters 6 - 8

    Mendelsohn J. and Roberts, C. 1997. An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Windhoek. [Chapters 6 - 8]

    An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi. Chapters 6 - 8
  • An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi: Chapters 9 - end

    Mendelsohn J. and Roberts, C. 1997. An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Windhoek. [Chapters 9 - end]

    An environmental profile and atlas of Caprivi. Chapters 9 - end
  • Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA

    Suich, H., Busch, J. and Barbancho, N. 2005. Economic impacts of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: Baseline of tourism in the Kavango-Zambesi TFCA. Conservation International South Africa, Paper No. 4

    The Kavango–Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade. Recently, the idea has been revitalised by the ministers of those five countries, who seek to establish a world-class transfrontier conservation area and tourism destination in the Okavango and Zambezi river basin regions of those countries, within the context of sustainable development.
  • Information on Balyerwa Conservancy

    Information on Balyerwa Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Balyerwa Conservancy
  • Information on Dzoti Conservancy

    Information on Dzoti Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Dzoti Conservancy
  • Information on Kwandu Conservancy

    Information on Kwandu Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Kwandu Conservancy
  • Information on Mashi Conservancy

    Information on Mashi Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Mashi Conservancy
  • Information on Mayuni Conservancy

    Information on Mayuni Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Mayuni Conservancy
  • Information on Sobbe Conservancy

    Information on Sobbe Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Sobbe Conservancy
  • Information on Wuparo Conservancy

    Information on Wuparo Conservancy from NACSO website

    Fact sheets, notice-board posters etc on Wuparo Conservancy
  • Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    Jones, B.T.B. 2008. Legislation and Policies relating to Protected Areas, Wildlife Conservation, and Community Rights to Natural Resources in countries being partner in the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area. Final Report

    This report has been commissioned in order to provide a foundation for the Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area (TFCA) countries to consider policy and legal harmonisation regarding the management of natural resources. The KAZA participating countries are Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
  • Mashi Conservancy map

    Map of Mashi Conservancy showing community enterprises, lodges, management zones, community forests and more. By Sylvia Thomson and Roxanne Godenschweig

    » Download
  • Mayuni Conservancy map

    Map of Mayuni Conservancy showing community enterprises, lodges, infrastructure, and more. By Sylvia Thomson and Roxanne Godenschweig

    » Download
  • Mudumu Landscape semi-controlled landfill site simplified waste disposal site design

    Mudumu Landscape semi-controlled landfill site simplified waste disposal site design

    This report outlines the design objectives and considerations that need to be taken into account in the design of a landfill. Management systems for the control of leachate and groundwater as well as the operations and maintenance are discussed
    » Download
  • Mudumu North Complex

    Mudumu North Complex. NACSO. 1 pp.

    Poster providing information on Mudumu North Complex
  • Namibia Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment

    Ministry of Environment and Tourism. 2008. Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Namibia. Final Report

    Vulnerability and Adaptation assessment to climate change carried out in preparation of the Second National Communication in meeting Government’s obligations to the UNFCCC. The report addresses the vulnerability of the water and agricultural sectors to climate change, and suggest adaptation measures to cope with the expected impacts. Vulnerability is placed in the socio-economic contexts of rural areas, in particular the Karas and Caprivi regions.
    » Download
  • Strategic Environmental Assessment of the tourism sector for the Mudumu Landscape

    Strategic Environmental Assessment of the tourism sector for the Mudumu Landscape

    The SEA for the Mudumu tourism sector comprised consultations, a review of the existing literature and legal framework and a visit to the Mudumu Landscape.
    » Download
  • Tourism in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    Suich, H. 2005. Tourism in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

    The Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a multi-objective initiative involving parts of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The concept of a major tourism destination based on the extensive network of protected areas and wildlife populations has been discussed and developed over the last decade

Relevant literature

  • Bwabwata National Park - People and wildlife - a shared history

    Bwabwata National Park - People and wildlife - a shared history

    Bwabwata has been inhabited for millennia, but it is the more recent history that has shaped the Bwabwata National Park of today. Proclaimed in the 1960s as the Caprivi Nature Reserve, then as the Caprivi Game Park, no initial wildlife management took place because the area was a restricted security zone, occupied first by the South African police and subsequently by the South African Defence Force (SADF).
  • Faites vos jeux! Interests and socio-economic development in the Caprivi Region from a historical perspective

     Zeller, W. 2000. Faites vos jeux! Interests and socio-economic development in the Caprivi Region from a historical perspective


Relevant literature

  • A Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Floods and Flood Impact in Eastern Caprivi, Namibia

     Mudabeti, A.M. 2011. A Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Floods and Flood Impact in Eastern Caprivi, Namibia. Degree of Master of Science (Geographical Information SCience and Systems) - Msc (GISc), Centre for Geoinformatics, Salzburg University

  • Aerial Wildlife Census of the Caprivi River Systems - a survey of water bodies and floodplains 11 - 20 August 2004

     Stander, P. 2004. Aerial Wildlife Census of the Caprivi River Systems - a survey of water bodies and floodplains 11 - 20 August 2004

    An aerial wildlife census of the Caprivi River Systems in Namibia was conducted between 11 and 20 August 2004. A total count of water bodies and floodplains of the Kavango, Kwandu, Linyanti, Chobe and Zambezi was done to asses the numbers of hippopotamuses, floodplain ungulates, crocodiles, and some large birds. Counting areas were divided into 15km2 blocks and, with the use of GPS and mobile GIS technology, each block was covered intensively.
  • Analysis of Historic Fisheries Research Data for the Caprivi Region, April 2009

     Hay, C.J. and van der Waal, B.C.W. 2009. Analysis of Historic Fisheries Research Data for the Caprivi Region, April 2009. Integrated Management of Zambezi/Chobe River System - Tansboundary Fishery Resource, Namibia/Zambi/Botswana. Technical Report no. MFMR/NNF/WWF/Phase I/2

    This is a summary report taken from the reference document that was prepared for the Namibia Nature Foundation. The study was commissioned to analyze all available data collected since 1997. The objectives of the report are spelled out in this document. This summary document highlights the important findings.
  • Assessment of Non-Wood forest products in eastern Caprivi. Community Forest in North-Eastern Namibia

    Assessment of Non-Wood forest products in eastern Caprivi. Community Forest in North-Eastern Namibia. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry

    Assessment of Non-Wood forest products in eastern Caprivi
  • Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2011

    Caprivi Game Count poster 2011

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi; dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2010, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2012

    Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2012

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi; dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2011, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2013

    Caprivi and Bwabwata Game Count poster 2013

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi; dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2012, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi crocodile research project

    Aust, P. 2007. Caprivi crocodile research project

    This report contains information on aspects of the ecology, conservation and management of crocodiles in North Eastern Namibia. It is intended to give an overview of the research work carried out by the Caprivi Crocodile Research Project over the last two years (2006/2007).
  • Caprivi Elephant Monitoring Project. Final Report

     Rodwell, T.C. 1995. Caprivi Elephant Monitoring Project. Final Report (October 1992 to October 1995)

  • Caprivi Game Count poster 2011: conservancies only

    Caprivi Game Count poster 2011: conservancies only

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi (conservancies only); dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2010, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi Game Count poster 2011: protected areas only

    Caprivi Game Count poster 2011: protected areas only

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi (protected areas only); dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2010, population estimates and trends
  • Caprivi State Forest - The Forest Resource

    Caprivi State Forest - The Forest Resource (From Forest Inventory). Namibia-Finland Forestry Programme

  • Economic Analysis of Land Use Policies for Livestock, Wildlife and Disease Management in Caprivi, Namibia, with Potential Wider Implications for Regional Transfrontier Conservation Areas

    Barnes, J.I. 2013. Economic Analysis of Land Use Policies for Livestock, Wildlife and Disease Management in Caprivi, Namibia, with Potential Wider Implications for Regional Transfrontier Conservation Areas. Technical Report to the Wildlife Conservation Society’s AHEAD Program and the World Wildlife Fund

    Standard cost-benefit analysis was applied to several future policy options for land use and animal disease management in Caprivi, Namibia. Emphasis was placed on the livestock-wildlife interface and Caprivi's role as central to the Kavango Zambezi (KAZA) transfrontier conservation area (TFCA). Empirically-based enterprise models measuring private and economic values for livestock and wildlife sectors in Caprivi were used to measure returns to investment for policy options regarding animal disease management and land use allocation. Options included commodity-based trade (CBT) and veterinary control fencing approaches to animal disease management. CBT is a production and marketing approach, which assures product safety regardless of the disease status of the area of origin and therefore permits adaptation of conventional (geographically-based) animal disease control measures. The basic measure of economic efficiency was incremental change in net national income at opportunity cost. Local livelihood contributions were also measured.
  • Elephant Distribution and Abundance in the Caprivi Strip: Results of an Aerial Survey in 2003

     Griffin, C.R. and Chase, M.J. 2004. Elephant Distribution and Abundance in the Caprivi Strip: Results of an Aerial Survey in 2003. Conservation International. Final Report, January 23, 2004. Submitted to Ministry of Environment and Tourism

  • Elephant Distribution and Abundance in the Lower Kwando River Basin and West Caprivi

     Chase, M.J. and Griffin, C.R. 2006. Elephant Distribution and Abundance in the Lower Kwando River Basin and West Caprivi

    During October and November 2005, we conducted aerial surveys over the Lower Kwando River Basin (LKRB) and the West Caprivi to determine elephant distribution and abundance. This region offers the best potential for restoring elephant and other wildlife populations into the conservation areas of southeast Angola and southwest Zambia.
  • Fish populations, gill net catches and gill net selectivity in the Kwando River, Namibia

    Næsje, T.F., Hay, C.J., Nickanor, N., Koekemoer, J.H., Strand, R., and Thorstad, E.B. 2004. Fish populations, gill net catches and gill net selectivity in the Kwando River, Namibia. - NINA Project Report 27. 64pp.

    The objective of this report is to provide baseline information about the fish resources in the Namibian part of the Kwando River to form the biological foundation for recommendations for a sustainable management of the fish resources. Based on fish survey data from the period 1997-1999, the fish resources are described through studies of species diversity, relative importance of the different species, life history parameters, catch per unit effort and gill net selectivity.
  • Forest inventory report of Caprivi Region

     Chakanga, M., Korhonen, K. and Selänniemi, T. 1998. Forest inventory report of Caprivi Region. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Forestry, Namibia-Finland Forestry Programme

  • Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi 2010

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi 2010

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi; dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2009, population estimates and trends.
  • Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi 2010: conservancies only

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi 2010: conservancies only

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi (conservancies only); dry season, live sightings. showing Numbers seen by conservation area, habitat, compared to 2009, population estimates and trends.
  • Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi: map of live sightings

    Game counts in Bwabwata and Caprivi: map of live sightings

    Maps showing live sightings of elephant, giraffe, kudu, roan, sable, buffalo, impala, reedbuck, tsessebe and zebra in the 2010 Caprivi game count
  • Notes on a spatial assessment of the risk of flooding in eastern Caprivi

     Nathanael, B. and Mendelsohn, J. 2013. Notes on a spatial assessment of the risk of flooding in eastern Caprivi. RAISON (Research and Information Services of Namibia)

    RAISON was commissioned by WWF (Namibia) to produce a mapped assessment of the vulnerability of eastern Caprivi to flooding with the objective that such an assessment will improve planning. For example, much of flood damage could have been avoided and need for emergency relief measures improved if information on the risk of flooding had been available to plan the location of infrastructure and settlements. This information is particularly important as predictions are that climate change will affect flooding in this region.
  • Results of a Crocodile Crocodylus niloticus survey in the river systems of north-east Namibia during August 2004

     Brown, C.J., Stander, P., Meyer-Rust, R. and Mayes, S. 2004. Results of a Crocodile Crocodylus niloticus survey in the river systems of north-east Namibia during August 2004

    This study has provided baseline data on crocodile numbers from aerial and spotlight counts. These data can be used with the results of future counts to determine population trends. The census has also provided information on their distribution of crocodiles in the Kavango and Caprivi regions. And third, it has resulted in the first population estimate for crocodiles in the north-east wetlands of Namibia.
  • Status of Wattled Cranes on the floodplains of north-east Namibia: results from an aerial survey during August 2004

     Brown, C.J., Stander, P., Mayes, S., Conradie, L., Haredoeb, P., Singwangwa, M. and Cilliers, W. 2004. Status of Wattled Cranes on the floodplains of north-east Namibia: results from an aerial survey during August 2004

    Areas surveyed: The Okavango River in Namibia, from just northwest the bridge on the Trans-Caprivi highway south to the Botswana border; the entire length of the Kwandu-Linyanti-Lake Liambezi-Chobe system, including the Mamili National Park; and the Zambezi river for its entire length on Namibia’s border, including parts of the adjacent East Caprivi floodplains.
  • Status of Wattled Cranes on the floodplains of north-east Namibia: results from an aerial survey during September 2007

     Brown, C. Chase, M., Nkala, T., Landen, K. and Aust, P. 2007. Status of Wattled Cranes on the floodplains of north-east Namibia: results from an aerial survey during September 2007

    The Okavango River in Namibia, from the Angolan border just northwest of the bridge on the Trans-Caprivi highway south to the Botswana border; the entire length of the Kwandu-Linyanti-Lake Liambezi-Chobe system, including the whole Mamili National Park; and the Zambezi River for its entire length on Namibia’s border, including parts of the adjacent East Caprivi floodplains, were survey from the air in September 2007.
  • Wild food: Use of natural resources for food in eastern Caprivi

    Mulonga, S. 2003. Wild food: Use of natural resources for food in eastern Caprivi. Research Discussion Paper No 62, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    The research was conducted in Salambala and Mayuni Conservancy and at Linyanti, which is a non-conservancy area. The main objective of the study was to look at the use of wild food resources by people as a livelihood activity in rural areas in Caprivi and the factors influencing the use of these resources.
  • Wildlife census of Namibia's North East Rivers - 2009

    Wildlife census of Namibia's North East Rivers - 2009

    The third aerial wildlife census of the Caprivi and Kavango river systems in Namibia took place during September 2009. These surveys cover the Kavango, Kwando, Linyanti, Chobe and Zambezi Rivers and their associated wetlands and floodplains. The area (~18,000 km2) is surrounded by Angola, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe, lying between the Okavango River in the west, and the Zambezi and Chobe Rivers in the east. The Okavango, Kwando, Linyanti and Zambezi rivers provide perennial water.
  • Wildlife resources in the Caprivi, Namibia. The Results of an Aerial Census in 1994 and Comparisons with Past Surveys

     Rodwell, T.C., Tagg. J. and Grobler. M. 1995. Wildlife resources in the Caprivi, Namibia. The Results of an Aerial Census in 1994 and Comparisons with Past Surveys. Research Discussion Paper No 9, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Namibia

    Protected and proclaimed areas in the Caprivi, Namibia, hold most of the economically valuable wildlife species in that region. This wildlife is presently being viewed as a potential resource base to support the many community-based conservation and development programmes in the Caprivi.
  • Winter counts of wetland and floodplain birds in the Kwando River and floodplain system, Caprivi

    Brown, C.J and Meyer-Rust, R. 2004. Winter counts of wetland and floodplain birds in the Kwando River and floodplain system, Caprivi

    Human and, increasingly, elephant pressure on Namibia’s wetlands and riparian belts are a major cause of conservation concern. Many wetland birds are listed in Namibia’s Red Data Book (Simmons & Brown in prep) because of population declines caused by the degradation and destruction of wetland habitats, and because of high levels of disturbance. Good information on the status of major wetlands and their avifauna is important for their conservation management. Birds provide one of the best indicators of wetland health. That is why wetland bird counts are such an important part of Namibia’s environmental monitoring system.